Thursday, January 18, 2007

A non-story...

Bloggers come under A LOT of criticism for their writing. Not only is the subject manner constantly critiqued, but the style of prose is often blasted as being conversational and damaging to the preservation of the English language (wtf - are we now french?). While I disagree, partially in defense of myself and my blogger friends, my argument can be expanded. Don't worry, this rant has a point. I believe journalism is undergoing a sort of global and technological transformation. To be a journalist, you once had to work primarily for a form of print media and have some sort of a degree that validated your work. This work was circulated primarily to a subscribing audience often in a common geographical area or with a common interest. Since technology so greatly expanded forms of journalism and qualifications for journalists, I have seen print media struggling to keep pace. While I still subscribe to certain monthly publications, I often find myself noting that I could usually find similar articles online. Since I am old school and actually do like paper, I maintain my subscriptions so I can have something to flip through at the gym or before bed. Regarding newspapers I can not maintain a subscription. Our local subscription based newspapers in this state suck. Simply put, they are journalistic trash. I do read the Times online daily, but here is proof that poor journalism exists everywhere. Note: I did not link it because I have had some trouble linking from blogger to the Times website - sorry.

Not only is this a worthless non-story, but what is the deal with the graphic. Is the woman supposed to be puking into her hand? How disgusting. What is going on with the whole hand connection between the mother and in-utero child anyway?



Really?
The Claim: Morning Sickness Is a Sign of a Healthy Pregnancy


By ANAHAD O’CONNOR
Published: January 16, 2007

THE FACTS It may be among the most unpleasant aspects of pregnancy, but can morning sickness also indicate a lower risk of miscarriage?




Leif Parsons

Readers’ Opinions
Forum: Parenting
A widespread belief holds that morning sickness can be a sort of blessing in disguise, or at least a favorable sign. Many dismiss this notion as folklore, but studies suggest that the truth is not so clear-cut.

Studies have shown a lower rate of miscarriage among women with nausea and vomiting of any severity during pregnancy. The most recent, published in The International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology in 2006, found that of 7,000 women studied, those who had nausea in the first three months were far less likely to miscarry. That appeared to support a study by the National Institutes of Health that found that women who had morning sickness in the first four months of pregnancy were 30 percent less likely to miscarry.

The reasons are unclear. Increased nausea and vomiting are associated with higher levels of a hormone produced by healthy placental tissue, and one theory suggests that the sickness may help women avoid foods that could harm a developing fetus.

But many women have normal pregnancies with no morning sickness, and many miscarry without getting sick. And many studies have failed to find any relationship between morning sickness and other adverse outcomes, like stillbirth and birth defects.

THE BOTTOM LINE Morning sickness is associated with a lower rate of miscarriage, though it is not necessarily a sign of a healthy pregnancy.

ANAHAD O’CONNOR

scitimes@nytimes.com

scitimes@nytimes.com

9 comments:

DD said...

No. Fucking. Way.

I was sicker than a mthrf*cker with Vivienne. She's dead now.

I wasn't sick once with Wolf. She's dead now, too.

Tinker said...

You're right that it's a pretty pointless story. I think it's common knowledge that morning sickness is associated with hormone levels (and thereby correlated with miscarriage rates), but do people actually believe it means that the baby is healthy?

What really got me though, is that peculiar graphic. I've never seen a baby pictured in utero that's not in the fetal position (and almost always head-down). If he's hanging off her pelvis like that, what's filling the top part of that bump? Is he giving her the thumbs up because she's sick? Weird.

Lut C. said...

Oh boy, and they dare criticize Wikipedia?

Baby Blues said...

"THE BOTTOM LINE Morning sickness is associated with a lower rate of miscarriage, though it is not necessarily a sign of a healthy pregnancy."
Oh that's trash right there!
So we should be glad we're having morning sickness?! So if it's associated to lower miscarriage why isn't a sign of healthy pregnancy? They're trying to associate something that's not even remotely associated to the other!
I agree, it's pointless.

Bea said...

You know, I feel there's news in there somewhere. But it's not exactly helpful to any individual (morning sickness? well that may or may not mean everything's going great! Same if you don't have any! So, er, yeah - can't tell you anything really!).

I guess it is interesting from the point of view of someone who works with the population of pregnant women *as a whole*, but me - and for that matter my OB whenever I'm in the room with him - are only ever interested in one. So. Yeah.

Bea

ellie said...

I don't know what to say-- anyone can write and some folks try to make a living doing it- Doesn't mean they write well or even valuable information.

Bea said...

Josie! It's ok - you don't have to comment *all the time* on my blog - thanks for letting me know you're reading! If you really have something to say about a post, then feel free to say it - I get all my comments delivered by email and I still read them even if it's not front-page news anymore. I promise I do!

Bea

Erin said...

Ooh, great reporting! They managed to fill up a lil chunk of space and say nothing at all! It's like all those little snippets on the evening news, the sensationalist, fear-mongering "what-ifs" that have no point.

linda said...

You know, if you put two IVF specialists in a room they won't be able to agree on anything despite a bevy of published articles at their disposal, so why should we believe any article written regarding morning sickness by someone who isn't qualified to be writing it in the first place? Phooey. I am "up to here" with all the medical nonsense published online and otherwise. And that graphic? Egad. They ought to fire their graphic designer.